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Clicking your Amygdala

 Clicking your Amygdala

Neil Slade, tonight's guest, is an advocate of using dormant areas of the brain to open up untapped intelligence and abilities. Studying for years with the unorthodox researcher T.D.A. Lingo in a mountainous retreat in Colorado, Slade developed a variety of exercises to enhance brain function. He has particularly focused on an almond-sized organ called the amygdala, which is part of the brain's limbic system (an area that is associated with emotion and motivation).

"Self-amygdala stimulation increases activity of the brain's most advanced and evolutionarily most complex structure...the frontal lobes," Slade writes in an article(1) for Viewzone.com. In lieu of being hooked up to electrodes, he has suggested simple visualization exercises such as imagining a feather tickling the amygdala. In a previous appearance on Coast to Coast, he conducted such an experiment over the air. For many this "clicking their amygdala forward" caused "immediate dramatic auditory, visual and physical sensations," Slade writes.

--L.L.(2)

1. http://www.viewzone.com/amygdala/index.html
2. http://archive.coasttocoastam.com/info/about_lex.html

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