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Last Show Recap

First half guest Dr. Glen MacPherson has researched and documented a Hum heard by people all over the world. The sound is louder indoors than outdoors, and louder late at night than during the afternoon. In the more serious cases, the Hum can affect quality of life; in a number of documented instances, the torment of the noise has been life-altering. MacPherson shared the latest from his scientific investigation into the phenomenon, which seems to indicate that the culprit may be electromagnetic pollution by Very Low Frequency (VLF) waves. This was followed in the second half by Open Lines.

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Could Hydrogen Cause Pollution?

 Could Hydrogen Cause Pollution?

The emerging "hydrogen economy" took a hit recently when a report by Cal Tech scientists concluded that hydrogen's widespread usage could cause significant damage to the ozone layer. It was a rather surprising finding for a substance touted as an environmentally-friendly replacement for fossil fuels.

According to the study, if hydrogen replaced fossil fuels, it could be assumed that 10% to 20% of the hydrogen would leak from pipelines, storage and cars. Accordingly, more hydrogen molecules would rise into the stratosphere, where they would eventually form water. "This would result in cooling of the lower stratosphere and the disturbance of ozone chemistry," Cal Tech researchers wrote.

But the researchers aren't against the growth of the hydrogen industry. Rather they are issuing their report as a warning. They suggest that the hydrogen infrastructure be especially designed to control leaks. Some hydrogen experts however believe the Cal Tech report may be overestimating the amount of actual leakage. Further, developments such as HydrogenSource's(1) processors, which would make hydrogen on demand at gas stations, could eliminate leakage and problems associated with transportation.

--L.L.(2)

1. http://www.hydrogensource.com/
2. http://archive.coasttocoastam.com/info/about_lex.html

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