With George Noory
Live Nightly 1am - 5am EST / 10pm - 2am PST
Life Elsewhere - Articles

Coast Insider

Not a member? Become a Coast Insider and listen to the show 24/7
Advertisement
Advertisement

Last Show Recap

In the first half, author, paranormal investigator, cryptozoologist, and ufologist, David Weatherly, discussed his fascinating work on the Black Eyed Kids (BEK) phenomenon, as well as his investigations into the mysterious Djinn, and the Slenderman meme.

In the latter half, ufologist and paranormal pioneer Timothy Green Beckley talked about 'UFO Repeaters,' people who have the unique ability to "make friends" with UFO occupants and bring them in for close repeated UFO photos. Contactee and channeler Marc Brinkerhoff joined the conversation for a segment.

Upcoming Shows

Wed 04-01  ET Manipulation Thu 04-02  China's Wealth/ Food Independence Fri 04-03  TBA/ Open Lines

CoastZone

Sign up for our free CoastZone e-newsletter to receive exclusive daily articles.

Life Elsewhere

 Life Elsewhere

Tonight's guest, Dr. David Darling, has pondered the idea of life in the universe. Many scientists have found the popular portrayal of humanoid-styled aliens as being statistically unlikely and a case of anthropomorphizing. "Looking at the diversity of life on Earth and thinking about how it has evolved should convince anyone that any aliens will have as much resemblance to us as a doorknob," said Daniel Altshculer, the director of the Arecibo Observatory.

Certainly it's a difficult task to imagine life so dissimilar to ours, that to us it wouldn't even be life. "Our kind of life, biochemical life- needs water...But it wouldn't surprise me at all that we found other kinds of non-water based life. You can find self-replicating vortices in the atmosphere of the sun. There are all sorts of self-reproducing systems in all sorts of environments," said biology expert Dr. Jack Cohen in an interview(1) on ThinkQuest.

One topic that's been batted around in both scientific and science-fiction worlds is what might be an alternative to the carbon-based life forms that we know. Silicon-based life is one of the most frequently conjectured upon, as silicon's crystalline structures are known to grow in a variety of life-like structures. Though it does bear some atomic similarities to carbon, silicon's chemistry appears to be somewhat problematic for carrying out certain biochemical processes. "The complex dance of life requires interlocking chains of reactions. And these reactions can only take place within a narrow range of temperatures and pH levels. Given such constraints, carbon can and silicon can't," Prof. Raymond Dessy wrote in Scientific American.

1. http://library.thinkquest.org/C003763/index.php?page=interview05&tqskip=1

Advertisement