With George Noory
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Last Show Recap

In the first half, Joseph Sansone, a consulting hypnotist, talked about the history of hypnosis, including its use in ancient cultures, as well its contemporary applications.

Nassim Haramein has spent most of his life researching the geometry of hyperspace, theoretical physics, cosmology, quantum mechanics, biology, and chemistry, as well as anthropology and ancient civilizations. In the latter half, he discussed connections between science, physics, and spirituality, and our place in an evolving universe.

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Fri 03-06  TBA/ Open Lines

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Passive Radar

Passive Radar

Passive Radar

Traditional radar works by sending out radio signals, listening for those signals to bounce off an object (such as a plane) and using the time taken for the round trip to calculate the object's distance. A new type of detection system, called passive radar, does not transmit signals, it only listens for them. By utilizing television, radio, and cell phone transmitters, along with high-speed computers to sort through the clutter, a passive radar system can detect the way moving objects change the surrounding signals.
Some experts believe these systems could be the death knell for stealth aircraft, which can evade conventional radar but show up as "shadows" on passive radar systems. Others worry this technology could be used for tracking people. According to Roke Manor Research(1), developers of CELLDAR™ (Cellphone Radar System), passive radar technology "can detect vehicles and even human beings at militarily useful ranges." Read more at New Scientist(2).

1. http://www.roke.co.uk/sensors/stealth/celldar.asp
2. http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99994299

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