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Scott Rubins

Biography:

For the last seven years, Scott Rubins has taught Forensic Science at New Rochelle High School. Scott has been the recipient of numerous grants and most recently was awarded a RadioShack National Teacher Award at the National Science Teachers Association, national convention in Philadelphia. This award is only given to 110 teachers nation wide. Scott also presented two sessions at this conference entitled, "Future Forensic Scientists, Where Do They Come From?" as well as The Court TV Forensics In The Classroom curriculum. Scott is a member of the Dental Identification Team for the Office of The Chief Medical Examiner, in New York City and worked for 9 months helping to identify victims of the World Trade Center Disaster. He is a member of the North Eastern Association of Forensic Scientists, The National Science Teachers Association, the New York Society of Forensic Dentists and an Applicant to The American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Scott is also the President of the Forensic Futures Education Group, a consulting firm that assists teachers and school districts in establishing forensic science courses and training.

Past Shows:

Astronomical Misconceptions

Phil Plait (website), who works in the physics and astronomy department at Sonoma State, has made it his mission to clear up misconceptions about astronomy. One of his targets, as the main guest on Monday's show, was the work of maverick physicist James McCanney. He's just plain wrong about comets not being made mostly of ice and rock and in his assertion that comets can be as large as planets, Plait said. He cited a probe that measured Halley's Comet and found it to be only 10 miles long back in 1985/6. He also took aim at the recent Harmonic Concordance, which was considered by many to be a celestially significant event as the Sun, the Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Chiron formed into a Star of David pattern over a two-day period. But Plait noted that the pattern doesn't hold up if it's taken into account that these objects are at vastly different distances from the Earth. For more on his comments on these and other "bad astronomy" topics view the specialpage he created for ... More »

Host: George Noory

Home Power

"Technology has given us the ability to make electrical power anywhere, on any rooftop or in any backyard," said Richard Perez, the publisher of Home Power. Perez, who was Tuesday's main guest, has been living off the grid since 1970, in a remote mountainous area in Oregon. The current power grid is an overtaxed and aging system he pointed out. Rather than sink more money into it, he argued for the use of home power through solar panels. These panels, either mounted on a roof or the ground, produce energy through their photovoltaic cells that is stored in large batteries. Interestingly, when the batteries reach capacity, the power can be fed back into the standard electrical grid, and a residents' electric meter will actually spin backwards, Perez explained. Another bonus of this situation, he said, is that the excess power can be distributed locally to neighbor's homes, alleviating the expensive process of sending electricity long distances along power lines. While not ev ... More »

Host: George Noory

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