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Last Show Recap

The Space Panel

In the first half, Dr. Joel Wallach returned to discuss the human body's innate ability to heal itself through natural means and supplementation, without the use of dangerous and expensive pharmaceuticals.

Dr. Mark Pitstick, MA, DC, who has over forty years' experience and training in hospitals, pastoral counseling settings, mental health centers shared evidence-based answers to important questions about spirituality and the soul in the second half.

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Thu 05-05  Ghost Hunting/ Mind Power Fri 05-06  Hutchison's Experiments/ Open Lines

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The Space Panel

Show Archive
Date: Wednesday - February 12, 2003
Host: George Noory
Guests: Richard C. Hoagland, David Livingston, Ken Johnston, Steve Troy

In a provocative Wednesday night show, Richard Hoagland joined George for the entire program to discuss a cover-up of Moon anomalies and the current Shuttle investigation. Three other guests were also featured as part of the line-up.

Hoagland and space expert Dr. David Livingston talked about the recent hearings being conducted into the Columbia tragedy. But rather than dwell on the specific cause of the mishap, they hoped that the hearings would raise the larger issue-- "that the US space program has lost its way. "There's no vision going back and forth between the Space Station," Livingston said. He and Hoagland agreed that a real vision would involve going to Mars or back to the Moon, to glean new discoveries.

Ken Johnston, who worked for NASA for 23 years, appeared in Hour 2, and described screening Apollo footage and seeing a cluster of lights in a moon crater accompanied by a plume of steam. But then two days later when he showed the footage to some officials, the crater material had been seamlessly removed. Perhaps even more surprising was Johnston and Hoagland's supposition that astronauts who went to the moon may have had their memories altered or blanked in order to suppress their knowledge of what they saw there.

Hoagland's colleague Steve Troy came aboard in Hour 3 to discuss photographic evidence of moon anomalies that he's studied extensively. In one case he described "crystalline rebar" that could be remnants of much larger structures. These materials curiously appeared in photos from two different Moon missions, in two different locations. The images discussed during the program can be viewed here.

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