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Listen with Windows Player
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NOTE: We'll discontinue our Windows Media Audio in August 2015. Subscribers will still be able to listen to the show through our Coast Player in the link above.
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Stem Cell Research

In the first half, Buck Wolf, senior correspondent and weird news editor for the Huffington Post, shared tales and adventures of his investigations into the strange. Followed by Open Lines.

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Stem Cell Research

Show Archive
Date: Sunday - August 1, 2004
Host: Art Bell
Guests: Dr. Ronald Klatz, Bonnie Crystal

Dr. Ronald Klatz, founder of the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, delved into the current controversy over stem cell research. Stem cells, which he explained are "progenitor cells" that can eventually become over 200 different types of cells, have been found in human and animal testing to have astonishing healing properties, he detailed. For instance, if injected into a person with cardiac tissue damage, the stem cells have been able to initiate a repair process in the damaged or scar tissue areas.

But the technology is being actively suppressed in the United States by the religious establishment, which associates stem cells with abortions, Klatz commented. However, he pointed out that embryonic stem cells can actually be taken from amniotic fluid which doesn't harm the fetus. He speculated that the pharmaceutical industry may also have a hand in the suppression of research, because if stem cell treatments take off, this will likely make the populace less reliant on pills and medications.

Klatz also touched on developments in anti-aging, saying there is a "pipeline full of incredible technology" on the horizon. For example, he cited early detection systems, such as PET scans that can discover cancer tumors before they can be observed otherwise. Klatz encouraged listeners to attend the 12th Annual Congress on Anti-Aging Medicine, taking place later this month in Chicago, for the latest information.

Peru Expedition

First hour guest, explorer Bonnie Crystal reported on her discoveries and experiences during her expedition to a Peruvian cave. One unusual finding was that of Asian-style letters and pictographs on a cave wall that she speculated might indicate that Asian people visited the South American continent earlier than thought. She also described a rock carving that looked like a "grey alien." Crystal, who will be continuing her Peruvian expeditions for another month, said that experiencing some of the caves was like going into a time machine of the past, due to their untouched nature.

One passage she entered "was like walking into a geode [that was] like being inside a fabulous array of jewels," she added. Crystal has sent us a series of photos documenting her cave explorations in South America. You can also view a video clip (requires Windows Media Player) which shows her hanging from a rope inside a cave.

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