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Surveillance & Privacy Invasion

A remarkable discovery has emerged in astrophysics: key properties of the universe have just the right values to make life possible. Most scientists prefer to explain away this uniqueness, insisting that a number of unseen universes must therefore exist, each randomly different. Astrophysicist Bernard Haisch joined George Knapp in the first half of the show to propose the alternative—that the special properties of our universe reflect an underlying intelligent consciousness.

In the second half of the program, veteran journalist Chris Taylor talked about how the Star Wars franchise has conquered our culture with a sense of lightness and exuberance, while remaining serious enough to influence politics, and spread a spirituality that appeals to religious groups and atheists alike.

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Surveillance & Privacy Invasion

Show Archive
Date: Tuesday - March 1, 2005
Host: George Noory
Guests: Lee Lapin

Private investigator and electronic engineer Lee Lapin shared the latest tricks and techniques of surveillance used by the world's best agents and trackers. Optical surveillance, which is often legal, has had significant advancements in recent years. For instance, he cited how the DEA might set up a camera placed inside a plastic street cone to view through a person's window. Some cameras, he continued, have been reduced to the size of a dime and can go under doors or through a keyhole.

In terms of audio surveillance, many new bugs are cell phone-based, said Lapin. If a person wanted to know if their phone was bugged, he suggested buying a second phone of the same model and taking both apart to see if there was anything extra in the suspected phone.

He also talked about how private details about people are often culled through "pretexting," a now illegal method, where personal information is gained by someone under false pretenses. Lapin said he is currently working with computerized voice stress analysis which he noted can yield much more accurate information about a subject than polygraph tests.

Bumper Music

Bumper music from Tuesday March 01, 2005

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