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Technology Dumbing Down Kids

Richard Syrett welcomes Dr. Richard Alan Miller, a pioneer in the annals of metaphysical and paranormal exploration. He will discuss protocols that were developed for the Navy SEALs to create super soldiers and how these tools can be used today for your own personal evolution of consciousness. In part two, inventor and scientist Aaron Murakami will discuss his research, theories, and experiments into using water as a fuel. Murakami says the fuel that another pioneering researcher was making was from electrolyzed water and ionized air - the real fuel is a product of these two components.

From 6-10p PT, Art Bell: Somewhere in Time travels back to February 28, 1996, for a night of Open Lines with discussions about the 1996 primary elections, earthquakes, Cuban concerns, UFOs, the battle of good vs. evil, and NASA recovering a $40 million satellite.

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Technology Dumbing Down Kids

Show Archive
Date: Saturday - May 16, 2009
Host: Ian Punnett
Guests: Mark Bauerlein

Emory University professor Mark Bauerlein discussed his theory that the digital age, with its promise of instant communication and easy access to information, has actually produced a generation of young people (those under 30) who are less knowledgeable about the world around them and more self-absorbed than any that has preceded it.

"We keep waiting for the fruits of all of this greater knowledge and information to come forth in younger people," Bauerlein said. Yet, reading scores are down since the early 1990s, an increasing number of incoming college freshmen are placed into remedial courses, and employers complain about poor communications skills in their younger employees, he continued.

Bauerlein believes electronic messaging and social-networking (Twitter, MySpace, Facebook, etc.) have contributed to the problem, as these digital tools allow young people to remain entirely focused on themselves and their peers. Kids communicate with friends 24 hours a day about every trivial detail of their lives, Bauerlein said. This immersion in the adolescent world is preventing young people from growing up, he suggested.

In addition, Bauerlein pointed out that constant texting, with its simple sentences and peculiar grammar, has reduced this generations' capacity to write cogent arguments, read dense texts and in general perform well as students. As many as 55% of high school students study or read no more than one hour per week, he added.

Bauerlein also expressed concern over statistics that show the number of young Americans majoring in science, math and technology has dropped over the last 20 years. A larger number of foreign born students are now seeking advanced degrees in these subjects, he said. This dramatic shift will eventually cause the United States to lose its intellectual edge to other nations, such as China and India, and ultimately diminish the country's economic power as well, Bauerlein warned.

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Ian Punnett's Blog

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Complex Hubble Spacewalk a Success

Two spacewalking astronauts, John Grunsfeld and Drew Feustel, spent six and a half hours on Saturday installing a new high-tech instrument on Hubble as well as performing complex repairs to the space telescope's broken planetary camera. The repair work is considered the most difficult ever attempted in orbit, according to NASA. Hubble will be released from Atlantis on Tuesday after additional maintenance, and is expected to function for another five to 10 years. Further info and video available at MSNBC.

Bumper Music

Bumper music from Saturday May 16, 2009

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