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Last Show Recap

Horse in a Human Body

In the first half of the program, George Knapp welcomed nuclear power expert, Arnie Gundersen, who discussed how, more than four years after the triple meltdown at Fukushima, nuclear waste inside the reactors continues to bleed into the Pacific Ocean creating low concentrations of radioactivity that have already migrated across the Pacific to the west coast of North America. Steven Starr of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation briefly joined the conversation during the second hour.

In the latter half, former Nevada consumer advocate and public utility commissioner Timothy Hay addressed the attempt by power companies to crush rooftop solar energy by throwing up roadblocks to make it harder for homeowners to install, and how electric companies hate the idea of clean, plentiful solar taking away their business.

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Horse in a Human Body

Show Archive
Date: Saturday - December 18, 2010
Host: Ian Punnett
Guests: Jason 'The Horse'

During the middle two hours of the show, Ian welcomed back Jason 'The Horse', a man who believes he is actually a horse living in a human body. "Growing up I always had the feeling that I should be somewhere else doing something else in a different form," Jason explained. He recalled how seeing a billboard of an English countryside as a child brought back memories of his past life as a shire draft horse in Britain, as well as the profound effect encountering horses for the first time had on him. Upon catching their scent, Jason said he was filled with an overwhelming desire to be with them.

According to Jason, even though he is in human form, horses recognize him as a fellow member of their species. On a recent trip to England (where he believes he originally came from), a Quarter Horse named Buster sniffed him and "started trembling as if he'd seen a ghost," Jason said. Buster then immediately got the attention of his stable mate, a Friesian named Dante, who issued a challenge for dominance, he added. Jason also admitted that he is attracted to mares (but does not act on those impulses), greatly misses his previous equine state, and looks forward longingly to the day when he can once again run on four hooves.

The first half-hour featured an audio tribute to the late futurist, and former C2C guest, John Jay Harper, from his 1/5/08 interview with Ian Punnett. The final hour of the program was devoted to Open Lines.

Related Articles

In Memoriam: John Jay Harper

Futurist John Jay Harper, a former guest on C2C, passed away on December 15th. A prolific researcher of earth changes, Harper authored the book Tranceformers: Shamans of the 21st Century, made numerous public speaking appearances, and served as editor-in-chief of Reality Press in California. Remarkably, these accomplishments came after Harper had already had a lengthy and successful career with the Department of Defense, where he worked at a number of Top Secret facilities. Our condolences to his family and colleagues.

First image of X-rays around lightning

Researchers in Florida have captured on camera the first picture of X-rays produced by a bolt of lightning. The crude image, taken by an immense camera fitted with 30 radiation detectors, could give scientists a better understanding of this atmospheric phenomenon and how to predict its behavior. "We understand how a star explodes halfway across the universe better than we understand the lightning right above our heads," said Joseph Dwyer, a professor of physics at the Florida Institute of Technology. More at Mail Online.

Bumper Music

Bumper music from Saturday December 18, 2010

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