With George Noory
Live Nightly 1am - 5am EST / 10pm - 2am PST
Vampirism - Shows

Coast Insider

Not a member? Become a Coast Insider and listen to the show 24/7
Advertisement
Advertisement

Last Show Recap

Vampirism

George Knapp welcomed DNA expert, Melba Ketchum, for the entire 4-hour program, for a discussion on her Bigfoot research, as well as her testing or planned testing of samples from four giant and elongated skulls, and other giant remains. She addressed some of the controversies surrounding her previous DNA analysis of alleged Bigfoot hair and related samples, which yielded strange results that suggested some kind of human hybrid or mutation.

Upcoming Shows

Tue 03-31  GMO Fraud Wed 04-01  ET Manipulation Thu 04-02  China's Wealth/ Food Independence Fri 04-03  TBA/ Open Lines

CoastZone

Sign up for our free CoastZone e-newsletter to receive exclusive daily articles.

Vampirism

Show Archive
Date: Wednesday - January 23, 2013
Host: George Noory
Guests: James Rollins, Michael Levine

Author James Rollins, who has a degree in Veterinary Medicine, discussed the literary and medical back story of vampirism, uniting the forensics, anthropology, and myths to show how vampires have earned their place in history. The notion of vampires as the blood-sucking undead has existed for millennia, he pointed out. In Homer's epic, The Odyssey, for instance, he refers to ghosts consuming blood so they can communicate with the living. Around the year 1100, the historian William of Newburgh wrote of an evil man who died from a fall, and then was seen rising from his grave, and terrorizing the villagers. "The brave young men, excited by wrath, struck a wound on the lifeless corpse, from which so much blood flowed that it was understood that he had been the bloodsucker of many," Newburgh wrote.

Many accounts detail how newly buried corpses were dug up and found with blood on their lips, their stomachs bloated as if from a recent gorging, with fresh looking organs, clawlike fingernails, and elongated teeth. Terrified villagers often drove stakes through the heart of the corpses or chopped off their heads. Rollins sought out a scientific or medical explanation for such reports. Necrotizing bacteria inside a corpse can cause the body to bloat with gas, distending the stomach, and moving blood from the lungs up the trachea to stain teeth and lips. Also the decay of flesh and gums would make the teeth and fingernails appear longer. Specific diseases such as rabies may have also contributed to the vampire mythos, he noted, adding that when humans are infected with the virus they can drool bloody saliva, act violently, and are sensitive to strong smells such as garlic.

Rollins also related vampirism to a rare genetic quirk called porphyria, and a more common condition known as polymorphic light eruption, in which sufferers are allergic or highly sensitive to the sun, and break out in blisters if exposed. They shun mirrors because of the risk of light reflection in a darkened room, "and often times sleep in dark boxes to further avoid the daylight," he noted. Interestingly, one of the treatments for this condition was a dose of enzymes their bodies couldn't produce, and before the modern medical era, the only way they could get those enzymes was through blood. Rollins touched on literary and filmic representations of vampires throughout the years (including his current novel, Blood Gospel), and how each generation has tended to re-invent the character, and relate it to social and cultural concerns of their time. He also analyzed the phenomenon of psychic vampires.

Psychology of Social Media

First hour guest, PR expert Mike Levine commented a new study that shows Facebook use may trigger envy and feelings of loneliness. Looking at idealized versions of friends' lives through their posted content such as photos of their vacations and celebrations can lead to discontent, and feeling that one is not measuring up, he explained. He spoke about how some people (particularly the young) are suffering from a kind of "social retardation," never looking up from their mobile devices, to even greet or say hello to anyone. Levine also addressed how businesses are using social media, creating a relationship with their customers, rather than using such media for direct sales.

News segment guests: Mitch Battros, Catherine Austin Fitts

Related Articles

'Magnetic Braids' in Solar Atmosphere

'Magnetic Braids' in Solar Atmosphere

A NASA space telescope has revealed magnetic fields of super-hot matter in the sun's outer atmosphere that are interwoven like braids of hair. The find may explain why the surface of the sun is cooler than its corona, and help predict upcoming space weather. More at Space.com and Discovery News.

Bumper Music

Bumper music from Wednesday January 23, 2013

  • 1979
    Smashing Pumpkins
Advertisement