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Scan Suggests Shakespeare's Skull Was Stolen

Scan Suggests Shakespeare's Skull Was Stolen

A ground-penetrating radar scan of Shakespeare's grave has discovered that the entombed body of The Bard appears to be missing his skull!

Part of a program devoted to celebrating the 400th anniversary of the playwright's death, the high tech investigation managed provided a number of answers to the myths and legends surrounding Shakespeare's final resting place.

While similar research projects often only serve to debunk urban legends, this particular undertaking may have provided a twist worthy of the man himself.

The archeologists behind the project were puzzled to discover that there seemed to be a significant disturbance in the ground where Shakespeare's skull should be found.

Additionally, project leader Kevin Colls told The Guardian that they spotted a "very strange brick structure" at the head of the grave.

Historians and Bard buffs have surmised that the potentially missing skull would confirm an old tale from the late 1800's which said that it had been stolen by grave robbers over a century earlier.

Colls theorized that the Shakespeare skull would have proven to be a prime target in that era when grave robbing was a strangely popular pastime.

The research was also able to settle a number of other stories that have been attached to the body of The Bard and show that, contrary to some claims, he was not buried standing up nor 17 feet deep.

Despite the intriguing evidence that Shakespeare's skull may have been removed, an official with the church where the body is buried was still skeptical of the claims.

Since they are steadfast that the grave will not be physically disturbed, we may be forced to wait until even better ground penetrating technology is available to settle the mystery once and for all.

Leave it to Shakespeare to provide a dramatic, unfolding story for us even in death.

Source: The Guardian

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