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'Fairy Friends' Oppose Scottish Fish Farm

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By Tim Binnall

A proposed fish farm in Scotland has been met with some odd opposition in the form of an objection from people concerned that it will disturb fairies. Planners for the site had reportedly envisioned it occupying the waters off the coast of the country's Isle of Skye. However, at a hearing about the project this week, officials revealed that they had received a rather remarkable letter taking issue with the fish farm on account of what the authors believe to be supernatural beings long said to live in the area.

Penned by a group calling themselves the 'Friends of the Eilean Fhlodaigearraidh Faeries,' the seemingly quite serious missive declared that the location for the proposed fish farm just so happens to be the home of a population of mermaid-like entities known as 'ashrai.' They went on to explain that these sea fairies, for lack of a better term, "live for hundreds of years and will come up to the surface of the water once each century to bathe in the moonlight which they use to help them grow."

Alas, the letter continued, "it is proven that the steel of the fish farm cages draws many ashrai to the surface, with only one result: they melt." In addition to that worrisome scenario, the group said, fishermen working at the location could also be at risk. They explained that is because the aquatic entities "will attempt to lure him with promises of gold and jewels into the deepest part of the ocean to drown or simply to trick him."

Beyond these concerns, the letter claimed that seals living in the region are actually supernatural beings in disguise that may also be impacted by the fish farm being built. And it also cited several esoteric landmarks in the area which could be disturbed by their new neighbor. Ultimately, the office tasked with overseeing the project rejected the proposal citing environmental concerns raised by various other groups as well as, in an apparent nod to the fairy friends, "ancient folklore."

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