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In Coast You Missed It 6/29/18

In Coast You Missed It 6/29/18

This past week, Coast to Coast AM traveled back to the distant past to learn about ancient megalithic monuments and looked ahead to the future with a psychic forecast for the second half of 2018. And at the C2C website, we told you about a weird mystery object that had washed ashore in North Carolina as well as a myriad of ghost stories from around the world. Before you head out on your holiday weekend, check out some of our highlights from this week ... In Coast You Missed It.

We're not quite sure why, but this past week felt a bit like Halloween as several ghost stories found their way into the headlines. There were a pair of creepy ghost videos featuring both a purportedly possessed doll in Scotland and a haunted swing in India. And, back here in America, a restaurant in San Antonio was forced to close up shop for a few days after the owners spotted what they suspected to be a spirit filmed by their security system.

Meanwhile, with the first half of the year nearly complete, psychic Joseph Jacobs provided a forecast for the rest of 2018 on Wednesday night's program. Given the tumultuous nature of the world today, it should come as no surprise that Jacobs foresees even more turmoil unfolding throughout the rest of the year. Among his predictions for the autumn months were Melania Trump possibly filing for divorce and a Russian "tech attack" aimed at the US later this year.

The start of July usually only means one thing when it comes to the world of UFOs: Roswell. The famed 1947 event, which will be celebrated once again next weekend, was in the news this week when a geologist who has found an odd piece of metal at the legendary crash site revealed that the Bureau of Land Management had inquired about his finds. Although concerned that he may face some kind of legal trouble or, worse, have his discoveries confiscated, he fortunately managed to make it out of his BLM encounter with both his metal and his freedom,

Thursday night's program took listeners on a journey around the world by way of experts on megalithic monuments Hugh Newman and Robin Heath, who discussed the vast array of intriguing sites across the globe. The pair pointed out the preponderance of ancient stone circles that can be found around the world on nearly every continent. Taken together, the sites suggest that people in the distant past had a remarkable level of astronomical sophistication that seems to have been shared by a number of different cultures.

Something of a strange mystery has gripped a popular North Carolina beach community in the form of a bizarre metal object that washed ashore months ago and has been sitting in the sand ever since. Attempts to determine the nature of the strange debris has been particularly maddening as neither the Navy nor the Army Corp of Engineers are willing to claim the oddity. As such, the object remains stuck on the beach, much to the consternation of residents who would rather see it somewhere, anywhere, else.

And, while it's well known that we love the strange and unusual here at Coast, sometimes it helps to hear from the proverbial 'other side' of the paranormal divide. Skeptic Joe Nickell provided that perspective on Tuesday night's program, arguing for a number of prosaic explanation for popular paranormal legends and lore. Among the topics explored by the skeptic were the Shroud of Turin, the Fatima apparitions, ghosts, and even Bigfoot.

Coast Insiders can check out all this week's shows as well as the last five years of C2C programs in our enormous archive. Not a Coast Insider yet? Sign up today.

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