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Video: American Webcam Viewer Records Lengthy Nessie Sighting?

By Tim Binnall

An Oregon woman watching the Loch Ness webcam recorded a rather remarkable incident in which a anomalous form can be seen swimming across the water over the course of approximately ten minutes. Kalynn Wangle reportedly witnessed the weirdness earlier this month as she watched the wildly popular livestream which is stationed at the iconic Scottish site. Having previously seen something out of the ordinary at the location back in April, it would appear that the diligent webcam viewer is on something of a hot streak as this would be her second sighting this year.

In a video capture of the moment in question, a dark object appears in the middle of Loch Ness and then begins moving across the water. Sharing the footage on YouTube, she notes that the oddity "changes shape and goes under the water and comes back up again." Wangle also posited that there appears to be some "splashing" coming from the perceived creature. As with most Nessie videos, the precise nature of the anomaly is decidedly difficult to discern, but the sheer length of the incident is quite noteworthy.

News of Wangle's sighting comes on the heels of a viral story last week in which a purported photograph of the Loch Ness Monster, said to have been taken by a tourist named Steve Challice, sparked worldwide headlines by virtue of the incredible clarity of the picture. Dubbed by some as perhaps the greatest Nessie image ever, the excitement surrounding the picture ultimately turned into disappointment when an investigation by researchers revealed that it was almost certainly the product of Photoshop.

As for this most recent report from Wangle, her video capture was accepted by the Official Loch Ness Monster Sightings Register as the fifth recorded 'encounter' with the creature this year. For those keeping score at home, the much-discussed photograph from Challice is not on the list and, as of now, every official sighting in 2020 has been by way of the Loch Ness webcam. To that end, with coronavirus-related travel restrictions keeping tourists from visiting the site, it remains to be seen if the monster will make an 'in-person' appearance at all this year or if every sighting of 2020 will be of the virtual variety.

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