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Superstitions

Melvin Dummar says a grand conspiracy has denied him his portion of billionaire Howard Hughes' vast estate. Many consider Dummar to be a fraud but an in-depth investigation by Gary Magnesen has apparently shown Dummar to be a good samaritan who saved Hughes from certain death. Both joined George Knapp to discuss why Hughes was in the desert, as well as those who schemed to deny Dummar and several institutions of their rightful share of the Hughes estate. In the first hour, veteran music journalist Joel Selvin talked about the notorious Rolling Stones Altamont concert of 1969, considered by many to be rock’s darkest day.

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Superstitions

Show Archive
Date: Friday - February 13, 2004
Host: George Noory
Guests: Open Lines, Charles Reichblum

Charles Reichblum, the author of the Knowledge in a Nutshell book series, discussed the origins of various superstitions. A number of "bad luck" superstitions such as Friday the 13th and stepping under a ladder, stem from religious connotations, he said. Seeing a black cat cross, got its bad rap, because during the Middle Ages, witches were thought to be able to assume the form of a feline, said Reichblum, though he noted that to the Egyptians cats were considered lucky.

Reichblum also delved into good luck superstitions. A rabbit's foot is considered lucky because rabbits multiply so rapidly, thus the foot is a token of fertility. The tradition of knocking on wood comes from Indians he said, who would touch trees to ward off bad luck, because trees were struck by lightning and thus connected to the Sky God.

"We're afraid to defy these superstitions," said Reichblum, because people would rather not take a chance, and that is why many of these traditions have lasted for centuries. Reichblum also shared accounts of unusual occurrences, such as the case of Robert Lincoln, the son of Abraham Lincoln, who was not only present at the assassination of his father, but two other US presidents, Garfield and McKinley, spread out over a 36 year period. In the latter half of the show, callers shared Friday the 13th stories, and anecdotes about various superstitions they have observed.

Friday the 13th Gallery

Thanks to all who responded to our call for "Dark Arts." View five images that were deemed especially spooky.

Bumper Music

Bumper music from Friday February 13, 2004

  • Spooky
    Atlanta Rhythm Section
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