With George Noory
Live Nightly 1am - 5am EST / 10pm - 2am PST
1961 Nuclear Power Plant Accident - Shows

Coast Insider

Not a member? Become a Coast Insider and listen to the show 24/7
Advertisement

Coast Insider

Not a member? Become a Coast Insider and listen to the show 24/7
Advertisement

Last Show Recap

1961 Nuclear Power Plant Accident

In the first half of the program, host Richard Syrett welcomed founder and director of the Palmistry Institute, Vernon Mahabal, who discussed the practice of palm reading and how it can be combined with astrology to make predictions about the future. Followed by Open Lines in the latter half.

Upcoming Shows

Sun 05-24  Anomalous Activities/ Secret History Mon 05-25  Alternative Health/ Inside Hollywood Tue 05-26  End Times/ Ancient Astronomy Wed 05-27  Chemtrails/ ET Communications Thu 05-28  Remote Viewing, Bigfoot, & ETs Fri 05-29  Haunted Wisconsin/ Open Lines

CoastZone

Sign up for our free CoastZone e-newsletter to receive exclusive daily articles.

1961 Nuclear Power Plant Accident

Show Archive
Date: Saturday - March 28, 2009
Host: Ian Punnett
Guests: Todd Tucker

Historian Todd Tucker spoke about a tragic episode in the U.S. military's race to develop nuclear power, examined in his new book Atomic America.

Tucker said three branches of armed forces (and some civilian organizations) had set up experimental nuclear reactors at the National Reactor Testing Station in rural Idaho. While the Navy was having success with a nuclear power plant to allow their submarines to stay submerged for months at a time, the Air Force was trying to overcome insurmountable engineering obstacles and build a nuclear powered jet, he explained.

Not to be outdone, the Army began developing a portable nuclear reactor, the SL-1, that could be used to power radar stations and bases in the Arctic Circle. The Army had already constructed a proof-of-concept prototype at Camp Century, a nuclear powered facility built beneath the icy surface of Greenland, Tucker pointed out. However, the Army's SL-1 reactor had at a critical design flaw that would prove deadly for three people on the night of January 3, 1961.

During a routine maintenance procedure, a single control rod was raised "too far and too fast," Tucker said, resulting in a massive explosion that destroyed the reactor and killed operators Jack Byrnes, Dick Legg, and Richard McKinley. Each victim was buried in heavily-shielded, lead-lined casket, after the head, arms and hands had been removed, he added.

Flood Update

Appearing briefly at the start of the program, investigative reporter Bob McNaney provided an update on the Red River Valley flood.

Related Articles

Three Mile Island Meltdown

Check out this 6-part PBS-TV documentary, Meltdown At Three Mile Island, which chronicles the terrifying near-catastrophe that occurred at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant on March 28, 1979.

Bumper Music

Bumper music from Saturday March 28, 2009

Advertisement