EMF Dangers / Dreams & Music

show's image
Date Host George Noory
Guests Daniel DeBaun, Craig Webb

With thirty years of engineering experience in the telecommunication industry, Daniel T. DeBaun is an EMF radiation expert. In the first half, he presented concerns regarding EMF's health impact-- the invisible electric and magnetic fields emitted by mobile devices, routers, and cell phone towers. While the FCC is supposed to be monitoring cell phone safety standards, the organization has not updated its data from years ago (which was based on thermal rather than biological impacts), he reported. Since then, we have learned that it's the biological impacts that are far more dangerous, and the emissions from cell phones may be particularly injurious to younger children whose brains are still developing.

Routers transmit at a higher signal, so it's advisable not to put them in a living area, he said. They can be placed in an out-of-the-way closet and still work, he noted. While transmissions from cell phones and routers can suppress the immune system, the new 5G signal has no association with the COVID virus, he explained, refuting the conspiracy theory. On the subject of smart meters--they are typically positioned on an exterior wall of a home, but if the other side of that is the wall of your bedroom, DeBaun recommended sleeping in a different room, or asking the power company to move the meter. The bedroom, he added, should be considered a sanctuary and kept free of routers and cell phones, as they can diminish the reparative quality of sleep.

---------------------

A pioneer in lucid dream research, Craig Sim Webb has 25 years' experience researching dreams and consciousness. In the latter half, he discussed the connection between dreams and creativity, and dreams that bring musical inspirations and melodies to life. Our inner perceptions in the dream state can be interpreted as visual and/or auditory content, he posited, and depending on how we tune in, some dreams seem to have their own soundtrack. Webb received a grant from the Canada Council for the Arts to record and share dream-inspired music. He gathered and compared data from different artists (including himself), who channel music from their dreams.

A couple of his dream-related compositions were featured on the air, including Voices, a harmonious choir-type sound, and Umbab-ee-ay-oh, a vocal with African inspiration. As Webb focused more on music from his dreams, he began to feel that he was receiving the sounds through "knowing" rather than hearing, indicating that dreams may offer unusual modes of perception. He talked about how during the pandemic era, people recall more of their dreams, and they seem to be more intense. He also touched on such topics as lucid dreaming, recurring dreams, nightmares, and the meaning of dreams. If we associate the feeling we had in a dream within a specific area in our body, he suggested it could help integrate the experience.

News segment guests: Howard Bloom, Mish Shedlock

Website(s):

Book(s):

Bumper Music:

Bumper music from Wednesday December 9, 2020

Last Night

Statement analyst Peter Hyatt discussed deception detection. Followed by authors Trish and Rob MacGregor sharing their work on their paranormal research.

More »

Upcoming

Full Schedule »

CoastZone

Sign up for our free CoastZone e-newsletter to receive exclusive daily articles.

title

Content Goes Here