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Digital Currency / Kentucky Goblin Case

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Date Host Connie Willis
Guests Sean Worthington, Geraldine Sutton

CloudCoin President, Sean Worthington, joined Connie Willis (info) in the first half to discuss his invention of Raida Data, which he claims is unhackable. Worthington said that the idea for cryptocurrency originated with libertarians and was first adopted by them to escape government controls and provide privacy in transactions. He referred to CloudCoin as the "first digital cash" since he "if you have the files on your computer, you are the owner," just as if you had cash in your wallet. Transactions are conducted by giving your numeric codes or passwords to anyone you want pay, whereupon they change the codes and it becomes their currency.

Worthington warned of the Chinese government's efforts to create their own cryptocurrency, which they believe can dominate world markets in the same way that U.S. dollars have been doing for decades. He said that "they can force their own people to use it" but that there is a great deal of resistance from the rest of the world. Worthington also claimed that CloudCoin is immune to hacking even from the looming phenomenon of quantum computers, which can power through most, if not all, encryption scenarios. He continued with his observation that "monetary systems are information systems," and that we try to be efficient with this information, such as getting a job that pays better or buying things at the lowest price. Worthington contends that "a perfect monetary system is going to give us a perfect civilization," and that his idea is the closest to this ideal as possible right now.

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In the second half, Geraldine Sutton Stith recounted how her grandfather and other relatives battled goblin-like ET creatures that appeared on their property one night in 1955 in the town of Kelly, KY. Many ufologists consider this case to be the granddaddy of UFO encounters. Stith said the extended family, including her father (11 people in all) were having a quiet Sunday evening at home at her grandmother's small farm, when her father's friend, Billy Ray Taylor, took him outside to show where he had seen a bright light in the sky. On the way back to the house, they were startled to see a three-foot-tall being with a "huge head, big glowing eyes, and arms that almost touched the ground." Soon, the house seemed to be under siege, with many similar beings appearing at the windows, peering through the front door, and even scraping their claylike hands across the house's tin roof.

When shot at with rifles and shotguns, the witnesses reported that the figures sounded as if they had been hit, but would simply fall or float down and "roll away." After a few hours of this siege, the family piled into cars and drove to the police station, telling the lone officer on duty what they had seen. The officer called his chief, the local Army Base, and reporters from the local newspaper, who all followed the family back to the farmhouse. Stith said they recalled the place "felt eerie, as if something had happened there." After a thorough search of the area, and finding nothing (except evidence of parts of the house and surrounding area having been hit by gunfire), the officials left. Soon after, one of the beings appeared at the window, and the whole scenario continued until daybreak. Within weeks, her grandmother moved out of the house. Stith concluded, "I know it's a hard story to try to believe, but something happened to them that night."

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