Elvis Presley's Death / Open Lines

Elvis Presley's Death / Open Lines

Date

HostGeorge Noory

GuestsSally A. Hoedel, Open Lines

On August 16, 1977, the world mourned the passing of Elvis Presley, who was only 42 years old at the time of his death. Author and Elvis fan Sally A. Hoedel dispelled some of the myths surrounding the "King of Rock and Roll," and presented her theory that Elvis was never going to live a long life. Elvis grew up poor with no access to healthcare, and his success allowed him to get prescription medication to treat a host of ailments and conditions some of which he had suffered with since childhood, Hoedel explained. He also had ADHD and used Dexedrine to remain calm and focused, she added. According to Hoedel, Elvis frequently forgot lyrics while performing live which many blamed on his medications but she suggested some of it was his sense of humor.

"There is so much disease within his family tree, so much young death, that he most likely was medicating his way through a lot of these ailments just to continue being Elvis Presley," she continued. He died in the same way as his mother and at a similar age, and his mother's brothers also all died fairly young, Hoedel noted. "When it gets to Elvis it's no longer a coincidence," she proposed. Much of Elvis' weight gain throughout his later career was the result of his health issues, including autoimmune disease, which caused inflammation and swelling. A photographer and background singer said they knew whether Elvis would have a good or bad concert based on the swollenness of his hands, Hoedel revealed. When Elvis died he had a disease or disorder in nine of the eleven systems in his body, and at least five of these issues were prior to fame and most likely from birth, she reported.

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Open Lines followed in the latter half of the program. John in Los Angeles called the 'Road Rage' line. He said incidents of road rage are common on L.A.'s Interstate 105, and he has had his own brush with death on that freeway. He recalled driving in traffic at about 45 mph in the right-hand lane when "it sounded like somebody had thrown a rock in the back of my window." He exited and stopped a gas station to find a large hole in the window. The next morning a friend pulled off one of the car panels and found a bullet fragment, John reported.

Marcy from San Diego phoned in to share some things she learned from a documentary she watched about JFK, Jr's airplane crash. "There's a button that he could have pushed... that would put the plane on automatic pilot," she said. It was evident he was stressed when he is heard on the radio saying they are not going to make it if they cannot make contact with an airport, Marcy noted. She also revealed a flight instructor had offered to ride along that evening as a safety precaution.

Kevin in Oklahoma told George he worked for an airplane recycling company in New Mexico. "Out there is a plane, and it's a small corporate jet, it's red on the outside and it's got red velvet seats on the inside, but it supposedly belonged to Elvis," he recalled, noting it appeared to sit eight to ten passengers. He said he believes it is still sitting out there.

News segment guests: Cal Orey / Kevin Randle

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