Alternative Health / Dreams & Nightmares

Alternative Health / Dreams & Nightmares

Date

HostGeorge Noory

GuestsDr. Joel Wallach, Delphi Ellis

In the first half, Dr. Joel Wallach addressed the human body's ability to achieve natural healing, along with the benefits of remedies and supplements that aid in the body's recovery from chronic conditions. Responding to a recent report that supplements aren't effective, he refuted the study saying they didn't look at supplementation of up to 90 different nutrients, which he considers necessary to maintaining good health. Wallach recommended a hair analysis/testing procedure that can show which minerals a person might be deficient in, and if they have exposure to toxic metals.

As to supplements for building bone strength and marrow, he recommended MSM, a sulfur compound that enhances joints, cartilage, and ligaments, as well as collagen peptides, derived from such things as fish, poultry, and beef. A person's bone marrow is particularly important to their health, he added, as that is where white blood cells and antibodies are made. Questioned as to what is the healthiest type of fruit to eat, Dr. Wallach replied that the health and quality of produce varies with the kind of soil they're grown in. Some soils, for instance, might be a lot higher in different types of minerals, he explained.

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Delphi Ellis is a counselor and mindfulness practitioner who has worked in a therapeutic setting since 2002. She started her helping career supporting people in grief, mainly those bereaved by murder and suicide. In the latter half, she discussed dreams and nightmares and how you can manage your mind at night, and get the most out of your nightly journeys. She spoke about the problem of insomnia and sleep deprivation, and how sometimes poor sleep can contribute to negative dreams or nightmares. It's a myth that everyone needs eight hours of sleep, she pointed out, as the ideal amount of sleep can vary among individuals and also changes as we age. Yet, for optimal rest, we should pay attention to our sleep hygiene, she advised, avoiding certain things like drinking too much coffee or exercising too close to bedtime.

Ellis considers dreams our "friends," as they can tell us things about ourselves that we might not see or be aware of in the waking state. Even though nightmares are often violent or scary, they, too, can send us valid messages. If someone can get to the bottom of what the nightmare is trying to say, "that person might never have that dream again because they don't need it" anymore, she continued. Keeping a dream journal is helpful for tracking when certain types of dreams occur-- for instance, nightmares may be more common when visiting with specific people during the day. She also suggested that we pay attention to the language we use during our waking lives. Statements like 'this is killing me' or 'I'm dying here' could contribute to violence or aggression in dreams, as the dreaming mind plays off the words we use during the day. Check out Ellis' YouTube channel for more tips on working with dreams.

News segment guests: John M. Curtis, Catherine Austin Fitts

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