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Challenging the Coronavirus Narrative / Stone Circle Mysteries

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Date Host George Noory
Guests Michael Tellinger, Alex Berenson

In the first hour, author and former New York Times reporter Alex Berenson disputed the current coronavirus narrative, citing concerns about closing entire sectors of the economy based on what may be faulty medical models. The lockdowns are economically destructive and constitutionally questionable, he suggested, though he understands why they were initially begun. "But now that we have a lot more data about the coronavirus, and it doesn't seem to be quite as scary or as dangerous to the general population as we thought," he commented, "it's past time to consider what we're going to do next." With the media centered in New York, which became the epicenter of the virus, it contributed to a magnification of the problem, he added.

The three main modes of transmission of COVID-19 are at home with ongoing exposure to someone with the virus, on public transportation like the subway, and in medical settings like hospitals or nursing homes, he reported. Further, in a recent study from China of 7,000 infections, only two of them occurred from outdoor transmissions. For this reason, Berenson thinks it doesn't make sense to deny people the right to be outside, particularly children, who seem to be at little risk anyway.

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During hours 2-4, scientist and researcher Michael Tellinger shared updates on his ongoing research on the anomalous ancient ruins and stone circles found in South Africa. Some of the ruins were first discovered around 500 years ago when Portuguese explorers visited the Capetown area, he detailed. The circles, which have no doors or entrances, were not used as habitats, said Tellinger, and there may be as many as ten million of them throughout the region, including in Zimbabwe. He theorized that all these structures worked together as one massive machine, generating and sharing electromagnetic frequencies, and serving as a portal. He has recently started using drones to capture aerial footage of the stones, which show how this was really "an engineering feat of unimaginable proportions."

Tellinger believes the structures are among the oldest on Earth and were likely built or influenced by the Anunnaki (ancient alien visitors). He has continued to discover and collect "mud fossils" on expeditions, and some of them ring like a bell when you clang them together. Tellinger has concluded that many of these stones, which have elongated or strange shapes, are fossilized body parts. Intriguingly, he's proposed that these fossilized parts come from gigantic humanoid creatures-- some as tall as one mile high in height! For more, visit Tellinger's YouTube channel.

News segment guests: Charles Coppes, Dr. Peter Breggin

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Bumper music from Thursday April 16, 2020

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