Religious Liberty / Miracle Stories

Religious Liberty / Miracle Stories

Date

HostGeorge Noory

GuestsDavid Horowitz, Joan Luise Hill, Katie Mahon

Conservative thinker David Horowitz has recently devoted much of his attention to exposing what he views as the radicalization of the American university. In the first half, he presented his contention that there's a war being waged on Christianity and that progressives seek to stifle their opponents and quash religious liberty. He talked about how America was founded on freedoms such as "inalienable rights" and various Protestant principles stemming from Christian ideas. Equality and diversity were part of that, he said. In our current climate, Horowitz accused the Democratic party of being "fascistic" and against the First Amendment, "and if you disagree with them, they shut you down."

With such things as banning prayer at schools (as well as a school football coach told to stop praying with his team), Horowitz believes "it's a war on freedom of conscience and religious expression." If you can't have any ideas that others don't like, he continued, "and aren't allowed to express them as ideas, [then you] you can't defend any freedoms you have." He also addressed the issue of racism, and denied that there was currently any systemic racism in America.

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At nineteen, Katie Mahon walked away from serial killer Ted Bundy with the help of a stranger who miraculously appeared, seemingly, out of nowhere. Joan Luise Hill experienced a series of coincidences that ultimately couldn't be ignored. In the latter half, they discussed miracles and how to recognize these crucial moments. Mahon detailed how, in the 1970s, she encountered a nicely dressed man in his thirties on the street in San Francisco, who told her he was recovering from eye surgery and needed help to find an address. Deciding to be a good Samaritan, she accompanied him to his hotel to help him with a payphone. They ended up in a deserted conference room, and just as she realized it was a trap, a bellman suddenly walked in and said to her, "Don't you think you should be going now?" He escorted her back into the lobby, but when she turned around to thank him, he was gone.

Years later, she recognized Bundy's picture in a newspaper article and wondered if the bellman could have been a type of angel, rescuing her from the clutches of a serial killer. We could think of miracles as a divine hand imprinted around the world that "we just have to look for," she added. Hill described miracles as a "beneficial interaction" between the divine and humankind. The two found a kind of "ripple effect" as they shared their miracle stories in their first book, which led to many people coming forward with their own miraculous accounts. Miracles are available to everyone, Hill commented, and her books co-written with Mahon seek to empower people to find these moments of wonder in their lives.

News segment guests: John M. Curtis, Charles Coppes

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